STEWART’S CAFETERIA 116 7TH AVENUE, NEW YORK, NY OPEN 1933-MID 1930s (NOW BANK OF AMERICA, PICTURED) “By the '30s, the action had shifted to, of all things, a cafeteria. The art deco building, at the corner where Christopher Street intersects Seventh Avenue South, is now occupied by an ugly General Nutrition Center and a second-floor tanning salon. But it once housed Stewart's Cafeteria and its successor (called the Life), major late-night attractions. ‘It was a place tourists would go to see the show that gays and lesbians put on, the way they dressed, their campy antics, the short hair the women wore and the makeup the men wore,’ Chauncey says. As for the gay habitues, ‘they could ridicule the conventions of heterosexual life, and many of them enjoyed that.’ Well into the '40s, more timid gawkers stood three and four deep outside the plate-glass windows.” (Paula Span, The Washington Post, 1994) 

STEWART’S CAFETERIA 116 7TH AVENUE, NEW YORK, NY OPEN 1933-MID 1930s (NOW BANK OF AMERICA, PICTURED) “By the '30s, the action had shifted to, of all things, a cafeteria. The art deco building, at the corner where Christopher Street intersects Seventh Avenue South, is now occupied by an ugly General Nutrition Center and a second-floor tanning salon. But it once housed Stewart's Cafeteria and its successor (called the Life), major late-night attractions. ‘It was a place tourists would go to see the show that gays and lesbians put on, the way they dressed, their campy antics, the short hair the women wore and the makeup the men wore,’ Chauncey says. As for the gay habitues, ‘they could ridicule the conventions of heterosexual life, and many of them enjoyed that.’ Well into the '40s, more timid gawkers stood three and four deep outside the plate-glass windows.” (Paula Span, The Washington Post, 1994)