PROVINCETOWN LANDING THE CORNER OF BLEECKER STREET AND THOMPSON STREET, NEW YORK, NY OPEN 1940s-1950s (BLEECKER STREET AND THOMPSON STREET, PICTURED) “In the spring of 1959, Pat, still obsessed with Mary Ronin, had ‘just that afternoon come back from a trip to Mexico’ when a young paperback writer, Marijane Meaker, ‘starstruck’ at spotting the author of The Price of Salt, introduced herself to Pat in a lesbian bar on MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village. Pat’s authorship of The Price of Salt was an open secret in New York lesbian circles, and the whisper had gone round the bar: ‘Claire Morgan is here.’ In the 1950s, says Marijane Meaker, ‘most lesbian bars were Mafia bars, with people watching the ladies’ room, letting the women in one at a time and handing them one piece of toilet paper, and a low-level Mafia guy with a pinkie-ring at the door vetting the entrants.’ Pat, who both liked and deplored lesbian bars (she hated the overpriced drinks, disparaged the downmarket ‘dikes,’ and found the casual encounters exciting), was something of a fixture in bars like Three Steps Down and Provincetown Landing, two of the several bars on West Third Street.” (Joan Schenkar, The Talented Miss Highsmith: The Secret Life and Serious Art of Patricia Highsmith, 2009) 

PROVINCETOWN LANDING THE CORNER OF BLEECKER STREET AND THOMPSON STREET, NEW YORK, NY OPEN 1940s-1950s (BLEECKER STREET AND THOMPSON STREET, PICTURED) “In the spring of 1959, Pat, still obsessed with Mary Ronin, had ‘just that afternoon come back from a trip to Mexico’ when a young paperback writer, Marijane Meaker, ‘starstruck’ at spotting the author of The Price of Salt, introduced herself to Pat in a lesbian bar on MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village. Pat’s authorship of The Price of Salt was an open secret in New York lesbian circles, and the whisper had gone round the bar: ‘Claire Morgan is here.’ In the 1950s, says Marijane Meaker, ‘most lesbian bars were Mafia bars, with people watching the ladies’ room, letting the women in one at a time and handing them one piece of toilet paper, and a low-level Mafia guy with a pinkie-ring at the door vetting the entrants.’ Pat, who both liked and deplored lesbian bars (she hated the overpriced drinks, disparaged the downmarket ‘dikes,’ and found the casual encounters exciting), was something of a fixture in bars like Three Steps Down and Provincetown Landing, two of the several bars on West Third Street.” (Joan Schenkar, The Talented Miss Highsmith: The Secret Life and Serious Art of Patricia Highsmith, 2009)