PARADISE GARAGE 84 KING STREET, NEW YORK, NY OPEN 1978-1987 (NOW VERIZON COMMUNICATIONS, PICTURED) “It was, as billed, a refurbished garage. It had no air-conditioning or central heating; it didn’t sell alcohol, which meant it could stay open after bar hours, often until noon the next morning. But it had a magnificant sound system that was constantly being improved by (Larry) Levan, whose marathon Saturday night sets carried dancers from sweaty exertion to exaltation while gospel-diva voices preached love. The club’s devotees came to dance, not to drink or pose. Among the countless clubs that have come and gone in New York City, the Paradise Garage is still mourned. ‘One important thing that the Garage did, which is not being done today, is to bring together black and white, straight and gay in one place,’ Mr. Charen said. ‘When people learn to dance together, they can get along.’” (Jon Pareles, The New York Times, 2000)

PARADISE GARAGE 84 KING STREET, NEW YORK, NY OPEN 1978-1987 (NOW VERIZON COMMUNICATIONS, PICTURED) “It was, as billed, a refurbished garage. It had no air-conditioning or central heating; it didn’t sell alcohol, which meant it could stay open after bar hours, often until noon the next morning. But it had a magnificant sound system that was constantly being improved by (Larry) Levan, whose marathon Saturday night sets carried dancers from sweaty exertion to exaltation while gospel-diva voices preached love. The club’s devotees came to dance, not to drink or pose. Among the countless clubs that have come and gone in New York City, the Paradise Garage is still mourned. ‘One important thing that the Garage did, which is not being done today, is to bring together black and white, straight and gay in one place,’ Mr. Charen said. ‘When people learn to dance together, they can get along.’” (Jon Pareles, The New York Times, 2000)