NELL’S NIGHTCLUB 246 WEST 14TH STREET, NEW YORK, NY OPEN 1986-2004 (NOW BLACK TAP BURGER, PICTURED) “Whatever the varied reasons for Nell's longevity, the club had a brilliant beginning. Almost from the moment that Miss Campbell set up the velvet ropes outside a former electronics store at 246 West 14th Street in the fall of 1986, people lined up behind them, longing to get in. Inside was a scene of decadent Victorian elegance, a small space that had been converted -- with deft use of wood paneling, beaded chandeliers, tufted velvet sofas and Oriental rugs -- into what seemed the drawing room of a somewhat dissolute English aristocrat... Not since the heyday of Studio 54 was there a more wilting review at the door. Despite its elite pretensions, Nell's opened with a rare policy of charging everyone $5 and letting everyone in (most other clubs let select people in free and charged others $20). But Nell's had a capacity of only 250, and so many people showed up that the policy became impossible. The attractive young men and women who guarded the gates became the Scyllas of style, plucking entrants from the lines of the hopeful that stretched toward the Hudson River. Most nights, most people were disappointed.” (John Marchese, The New York Times, 1994)

NELL’S NIGHTCLUB 246 WEST 14TH STREET, NEW YORK, NY OPEN 1986-2004 (NOW BLACK TAP BURGER, PICTURED) “Whatever the varied reasons for Nell's longevity, the club had a brilliant beginning. Almost from the moment that Miss Campbell set up the velvet ropes outside a former electronics store at 246 West 14th Street in the fall of 1986, people lined up behind them, longing to get in. Inside was a scene of decadent Victorian elegance, a small space that had been converted -- with deft use of wood paneling, beaded chandeliers, tufted velvet sofas and Oriental rugs -- into what seemed the drawing room of a somewhat dissolute English aristocrat... Not since the heyday of Studio 54 was there a more wilting review at the door. Despite its elite pretensions, Nell's opened with a rare policy of charging everyone $5 and letting everyone in (most other clubs let select people in free and charged others $20). But Nell's had a capacity of only 250, and so many people showed up that the policy became impossible. The attractive young men and women who guarded the gates became the Scyllas of style, plucking entrants from the lines of the hopeful that stretched toward the Hudson River. Most nights, most people were disappointed.” (John Marchese, The New York Times, 1994)