MEOW MIX 269 EAST HOUSTON STREET, NEW YORK, NY OPEN 1996-2004 (NOW SUFFOLK ARMS, PICTURED) “Brooke Webster is best known as the owner of Meow Mix, the legendary Lower East Side lesbian watering hole that closed its doors in 2004 after a decade of playing host to hot female dejays, up-and-coming bands like Sleater-Kinney, and even the coming out press conference for Ellen DeGeneres and Anne Heche. ‘I started Meow Mix as a Saturday night party with fifteen dollars worth of flyers and basically it blew up that first week, we had a line down the block, and it obviously met a need for lesbians and members of the queer community who didn’t just want to hear house music or house re-mixes. People wanted to hear punk rock, hip hop, reggae, Latin music and more edgy stuff. Four months into it, I bought half the place from the owner, who wasn’t doing very good on the other nights. Six months after that I got investors and bought him out. We started in October of 1994 and we were seven nights a week by February of 1995... When I first opened Meow Mix in the Lower East Side, that’s where we all lived, all the sort of edgy lesbians. We had cheap rent. We lived below Avenue A where no one else would live. That’s usually how neighborhoods grow. A lot of my customer base doesn’t live in that neighborhood anymore.’” (Christopher Murray, Gay News, 2006)  

MEOW MIX 269 EAST HOUSTON STREET, NEW YORK, NY OPEN 1996-2004 (NOW SUFFOLK ARMS, PICTURED) “Brooke Webster is best known as the owner of Meow Mix, the legendary Lower East Side lesbian watering hole that closed its doors in 2004 after a decade of playing host to hot female dejays, up-and-coming bands like Sleater-Kinney, and even the coming out press conference for Ellen DeGeneres and Anne Heche. ‘I started Meow Mix as a Saturday night party with fifteen dollars worth of flyers and basically it blew up that first week, we had a line down the block, and it obviously met a need for lesbians and members of the queer community who didn’t just want to hear house music or house re-mixes. People wanted to hear punk rock, hip hop, reggae, Latin music and more edgy stuff. Four months into it, I bought half the place from the owner, who wasn’t doing very good on the other nights. Six months after that I got investors and bought him out. We started in October of 1994 and we were seven nights a week by February of 1995... When I first opened Meow Mix in the Lower East Side, that’s where we all lived, all the sort of edgy lesbians. We had cheap rent. We lived below Avenue A where no one else would live. That’s usually how neighborhoods grow. A lot of my customer base doesn’t live in that neighborhood anymore.’” (Christopher Murray, Gay News, 2006)