MAD CLAMS AT THE HOLE 29 2ND AVENUE, NEW YORK, NY OPEN IN THE EARLY 2000s (NOW CONDOS, PICTURED) “‘I was living in San Francisco before I came to New York, but I wasn’t deejaying or throwing parties. I was mainly bartending and going to raves and stuff. I was in a two-man electronic band, and we played out a bit. Then I came to New York, was looking for a job, and ran into a friend who said, “Actually, there might be a night open at the Hole, and you can bartend—but you have to throw a party, too. It would start in two weeks.” I was like, “Oh yeah, I’ll do it.” I wasn’t looking to throw a party or anything; it just kind of happened. And that was Mad Clams. We would make these theme songs for the party, and then me and a bunch of my friends from that scene would make these weird exercise videos for the party, too. There was a fun one called “Exercise Your Clam.” [Laughs] And people started giving me all these wild exercise videos, too, like from La Toya Jackson and Estelle Getty. It was a fun time. I had been with Andy for a long time as a friend, but I never thought I would be on any album or anything. I thought we would just make some stuff, we’d go out and DJ around. I never really had the intention that this would turn into something;so yeah, I guess it was pretty organic and natural. But then all of a sudden, it just spun out of control! It became really crazy, really fast. There was so much hype. I mean, once I knew the album was coming out, I thought it would be received well. But I didn’t even know I was going to be on it! It was a real whirlwind after that.’” (Bruce Tantum interview with Kim Ann Foxman, 2012) “The eighties exercise videos projected on the giant screen at the Hole (29 Second Ave.; 212-473-9406) are a dead giveaway that the Mad Clams party is for dykes, but there always seem to be just as many cool gay boys present—though in light this dim, who can tell?” (Nymag.com, 2004)

MAD CLAMS AT THE HOLE 29 2ND AVENUE, NEW YORK, NY OPEN IN THE EARLY 2000s (NOW CONDOS, PICTURED) “‘I was living in San Francisco before I came to New York, but I wasn’t deejaying or throwing parties. I was mainly bartending and going to raves and stuff. I was in a two-man electronic band, and we played out a bit. Then I came to New York, was looking for a job, and ran into a friend who said, “Actually, there might be a night open at the Hole, and you can bartend—but you have to throw a party, too. It would start in two weeks.” I was like, “Oh yeah, I’ll do it.” I wasn’t looking to throw a party or anything; it just kind of happened. And that was Mad Clams. We would make these theme songs for the party, and then me and a bunch of my friends from that scene would make these weird exercise videos for the party, too. There was a fun one called “Exercise Your Clam.” [Laughs] And people started giving me all these wild exercise videos, too, like from La Toya Jackson and Estelle Getty. It was a fun time. I had been with Andy for a long time as a friend, but I never thought I would be on any album or anything. I thought we would just make some stuff, we’d go out and DJ around. I never really had the intention that this would turn into something;so yeah, I guess it was pretty organic and natural. But then all of a sudden, it just spun out of control! It became really crazy, really fast. There was so much hype. I mean, once I knew the album was coming out, I thought it would be received well. But I didn’t even know I was going to be on it! It was a real whirlwind after that.’” (Bruce Tantum interview with Kim Ann Foxman, 2012) “The eighties exercise videos projected on the giant screen at the Hole (29 Second Ave.; 212-473-9406) are a dead giveaway that the Mad Clams party is for dykes, but there always seem to be just as many cool gay boys present—though in light this dim, who can tell?” (Nymag.com, 2004)