BONNIE & CLYDE’S 82 WEST 3RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY OPEN 1972-82 (NOW CHINABAR AND ZINC BAR, PICTURED) “Bonnie & Clyde’s, a woman-only disco especially popular among women of color, closed as of January 11. Owner Elaine Romagnoli told Womannews the ten-year old disco’s lease expired, and the closing was not a result of lesbian harassment from neighbors or landlord, whose name she would not disclose. Romagnoli said she would like to open at another location, but as is known, ‘it’s not easy to find space.’ Bonnie’s, the restaurant upstairs from the disco, with its all-women and predominantly white clientele is not as lucrative an operation; however it tentatively remains open. The restaurant has literally been run on the backs of women of color who went to the disco downstairs. Romagnoli said that high volume business at the disco helped pay the bills at the restaurant. ‘Women don’t support women-only businesses,’ she complained. ‘The downstairs clientele wasn’t welcome in a lot of other places and that’s why (B & C’s) survived as long as we did. We weren’t supported by the women’s movement. We were supported by Third World Women - they’re discriminated against in all the other clubs.’ She said that the neighborhood, 3rd St. near Sullivan, didn’t want a disco there, mainly because of the drug dealing which occurred around it.” (Peg Byron, Womannews, 1982)

BONNIE & CLYDE’S 82 WEST 3RD STREET, NEW YORK, NY OPEN 1972-82 (NOW CHINABAR AND ZINC BAR, PICTURED) “Bonnie & Clyde’s, a woman-only disco especially popular among women of color, closed as of January 11. Owner Elaine Romagnoli told Womannews the ten-year old disco’s lease expired, and the closing was not a result of lesbian harassment from neighbors or landlord, whose name she would not disclose. Romagnoli said she would like to open at another location, but as is known, ‘it’s not easy to find space.’ Bonnie’s, the restaurant upstairs from the disco, with its all-women and predominantly white clientele is not as lucrative an operation; however it tentatively remains open. The restaurant has literally been run on the backs of women of color who went to the disco downstairs. Romagnoli said that high volume business at the disco helped pay the bills at the restaurant. ‘Women don’t support women-only businesses,’ she complained. ‘The downstairs clientele wasn’t welcome in a lot of other places and that’s why (B & C’s) survived as long as we did. We weren’t supported by the women’s movement. We were supported by Third World Women - they’re discriminated against in all the other clubs.’ She said that the neighborhood, 3rd St. near Sullivan, didn’t want a disco there, mainly because of the drug dealing which occurred around it.” (Peg Byron, Womannews, 1982)